Emotional Phases of Divorce

Emotional Phases of Divorce

Divorce is a shock to the system. Even if getting divorced is your idea, when it finally becomes a reality you may find yourself even more unbalanced than your spouse. The following are common emotions experienced by people going through a divorce. This list best describes the order of emotions from the perspective of the “receiver” (the spouse who is told “I want a divorce”), but is also relevant for the “deliverer” (the spouse who requests the divorce).

Denial

You find it hard to believe this is happening to you. You refuse to accept that the relationship is over and struggle with trying to find solutions to the marital problems. You will spend time believing that if you do or say the right thing your spouse will come back to you. You hate feeling out of control of the destiny of your marriage. You will be convinced that divorce is not the solution to the marital problems.

Shock

You will feel panic, rage, and numbness. You may feel like you are going crazy. You will swing between despair that your marriage is over and hope that it will be restored. It will seem impossible to cope with these feelings.

You will experience some common fears when thinking about your future alone. You will wonder how you are going to survive. Will you ever find love again, will the pain ever end or will you feel this way the rest of your life.

Rollercoaster

You can’t seem to settle your feelings and thoughts. You swing from being hopeful to feeling utter despair. During this stage, you will try to intellectualize what has happened. If you can only understand what is going on then the pain will go away and all will make sense again.

You will tell yourself stories to try to make sense of what is happening and your imagination will run wild. You will wonder if there was more you could have done, or if there is anything wrong with you. Maybe your spouse never even loved you. You will wonder if your entire marriage was a lie.

Bargaining

You are still holding onto the hope that your marriage will be restored. There is a willingness to change anything about yourself, or do anything that is asked, if you could just get your spouse to come back to you. The important thing to learn during this stage is that you can’t control the thoughts, desires or actions of another human being.

Letting Go

During this stage you will finally realize that the marriage is over, that there is nothing you can do or say to change that. You will become more willing to forgive the faults of your ex spouse and take responsibility for your part in the breakdown of the marriage. You will begin to feel a sense of liberation and some hope for the future.

Acceptance

The obsessive thoughts have stopped, the need to heal your marriage is behind you and you begin to feel as if you can and will have a fulfilling life. Suddenly you are looking ahead and not behind you, you are making plans and following through with them. You will open up to the idea of finding new interests.

This is a period of growth where you will discover that you have strengths and talents and are able to go forward in spite of the fear you feel. Your pain gives way to hope and you discover that there is life after divorce and that the future is, indeed, bright.